Video 29 Aug 1,479 notes

asylum-art:

Historic Glass-Plate Photos From Romania Restored And Turned Into Colorful Art

The recoloring of old black-and-white photos is an excellent way for modern audiences to re-visit, understand and associate with history. Jane Long, a photographer based in Australia, has taken a collection of old glass-plate images by Romanian photographer Costica Acsinte (or Axinte, depending on who you ask) and updating them by adding color and a bit of Photoshop magic.

Acsinte, who died in 1984, was a Romanian war photographer during WWI who also took photos professionally and personally after the war. In 2013, what was left of his damaged vintage glass-plate photos was digitized by the Costica Acsinte Archive to preserve it, and it is this collection that Long drew on to create her wonderful photo series.

Via boredpanda

Text 29 Aug 20 notes
Photo 29 Aug 707 notes
Video 29 Aug 108,961 notes
Audio 12 Jun 19 notes

polyphonyrocks:

A daily dose of Bach

The Well-Tempered Clavier Book 1, Prelude & Fugue No. 11 in F major (BWV 856)

Glenn Gould, piano

Played 179 times. via The Art from Siberia.
Video 17 May 113,605 notes

my-little-underground:

I will always be in love with 90’s Drew Barrymore.

(Source: flowerchildfantasies)

Photo 17 May 10,334 notes parislemon:

blazepress:

Aerial Shot of Muhammed Ali after knocking out Cleveland Williams in 1966.

Same pose, different plane.

parislemon:

blazepress:

Aerial Shot of Muhammed Ali after knocking out Cleveland Williams in 1966.

Same pose, different plane.

via ParisLemon.
Photo 17 May 185,113 notes
via ~.~..
Audio 17 May 1,427 notes

(Source: 50sand60smusic)

Played 9,199 times. via p o l y g y n e.
Photo 17 May 654 notes iamjapanese:

HAYASHI Hojirō(林保次郎 Japanese, 1922-2013)
憂鬱な凪  
Woodblock

iamjapanese:

HAYASHI Hojirō(林保次郎 Japanese, 1922-2013)

憂鬱な凪  

Woodblock

Quote 14 May 129,685 notes
Writing Advice: by Chuck Palahniuk

In six seconds, you’ll hate me.
But in six months, you’ll be a better writer.

From this point forward—at least for the next half year—you may not use “thought” verbs. These include: Thinks, Knows, Understands, Realizes, Believes, Wants, Remembers, Imagines, Desires, and a hundred others you love to use.

The list should also include: Loves and Hates.
And it should include: Is and Has, but we’ll get to those later.

Until some time around Christmas, you can’t write: Kenny wondered if Monica didn’t like him going out at night…”

Instead, you’ll have to Un-pack that to something like: “The
mornings after Kenny had stayed out, beyond the last bus, until he’d had to bum a ride or pay for a cab and got home to find Monica faking sleep, faking because she never slept that quiet, those mornings, she’d only put her own cup of coffee in the microwave. Never his.”

Instead of characters knowing anything, you must now present the details that allow the reader to know them. Instead of a character wanting something, you must now describe the thing so that the reader wants it.

Instead of saying: “Adam knew Gwen liked him.” You’ll have to say: “Between classes, Gwen had always leaned on his locker when he’d go to open it. She’s roll her eyes and shove off with one foot, leaving a black-heel mark on the painted metal, but she also left the smell of her perfume. The combination lock would still be warm from her butt. And the next break, Gwen would be leaned there, again.”

In short, no more short-cuts. Only specific sensory detail: action, smell, taste, sound, and feeling.

Typically, writers use these “thought” verbs at the beginning of a paragraph (In this form, you can call them “Thesis Statements” and I’ll rail against those, later). In a way, they state the intention of the paragraph. And what follows, illustrates them.

For example:
“Brenda knew she’d never make the deadline. was backed up from the bridge, past the first eight or nine exits. Her cell phone battery was dead. At home, the dogs would need to go out, or there would be a mess to clean up. Plus, she’d promised to water the plants for her neighbor…”

Do you see how the opening “thesis statement” steals the thunder of what follows? Don’t do it.

If nothing else, cut the opening sentence and place it after all the others. Better yet, transplant it and change it to: Brenda would never make the deadline.

Thinking is abstract. Knowing and believing are intangible. Your story will always be stronger if you just show the physical actions and details of your characters and allow your reader to do the thinking and knowing. And loving and hating.

Don’t tell your reader: “Lisa hated Tom.”

Instead, make your case like a lawyer in court, detail by detail.

Present each piece of evidence. For example: “During roll call, in the breath after the teacher said Tom’s name, in that moment before he could answer, right then, Lisa would whisper-shout ‘Butt Wipe,’ just as Tom was saying, ‘Here’.”

One of the most-common mistakes that beginning writers make is leaving their characters alone. Writing, you may be alone. Reading, your audience may be alone. But your character should spend very, very little time alone. Because a solitary character starts thinking or worrying or wondering.

For example: Waiting for the bus, Mark started to worry about how long the trip would take…”

A better break-down might be: “The schedule said the bus would come by at noon, but Mark’s watch said it was already 11:57. You could see all the way down the road, as far as the Mall, and not see a bus. No doubt, the driver was parked at the turn-around, the far end of the line, taking a nap. The driver was kicked back, asleep, and Mark was going to be late. Or worse, the driver was drinking, and he’d pull up drunk and charge Mark seventy-five cents for death in a fiery traffic accident…”

A character alone must lapse into fantasy or memory, but even then you can’t use “thought” verbs or any of their abstract relatives.

Oh, and you can just forget about using the verbs forget and remember.

No more transitions such as: “Wanda remembered how Nelson used to brush her hair.”

Instead: “Back in their sophomore year, Nelson used to brush her hair with smooth, long strokes of his hand.”

Again, Un-pack. Don’t take short-cuts.

Better yet, get your character with another character, fast.
Get them together and get the action started. Let their actions and words show their thoughts. You—stay out of their heads.

And while you’re avoiding “thought” verbs, be very wary about using the bland verbs “is” and “have.”

For example:
“Ann’s eyes are blue.”

“Ann has blue eyes.”

Versus:

“Ann coughed and waved one hand past her face, clearing the cigarette smoke from her eyes, blue eyes, before she smiled…”

Instead of bland “is” and “has” statements, try burying your details of what a character has or is, in actions or gestures. At its most basic, this is showing your story instead of telling it.

And forever after, once you’ve learned to Un-pack your characters, you’ll hate the lazy writer who settles for: “Jim sat beside the telephone, wondering why Amanda didn’t call.”

Please. For now, hate me all you want, but don’t use thought verbs. After Christmas, go crazy, but I’d bet money you won’t.

(…)

For this month’s homework, pick through your writing and circle every “thought” verb. Then, find some way to eliminate it. Kill it by Un-packing it.

Then, pick through some published fiction and do the same thing. Be ruthless.

“Marty imagined fish, jumping in the moonlight…”

“Nancy recalled the way the wine tasted…”

“Larry knew he was a dead man…”

Find them. After that, find a way to re-write them. Make them stronger.

— 

(via 1000wordseveryday)

I need to go back to school.

(via cordeliagablewrites)inspiration

(via thescienceofobsession)

My learning is ofwficially insignificant. My writing minor and all those classes do not make me as qualified as reading this has.

(via kikukachan)

Reblogging to keep.
I actually kinda hate his work, but this is good advice.

(via leighalanna)

(Source: redactedbeastie)

Photo 14 Mar 30,701 notes mollyalicehoy:

Basically every conversation I had this past week.

mollyalicehoy:

Basically every conversation I had this past week.

Photo 25 Feb 24 notes nataliakoptseva:

Kandinsky: Murnau. Garden. 1909

nataliakoptseva:

Kandinsky: Murnau. Garden. 1909

Photo 25 Feb 23 notes docmartn:

sadisticscribbler: - Timeline Photos -  facebook.com

I chedder the world and the feta cheese, everybody’s looking for stilton

docmartn:

sadisticscribbler: - Timeline Photosfacebook.com

I chedder the world and the feta cheese, everybody’s looking for stilton

via "Untitled".
Audio 23 Feb 973 notes

Nirvana “Something In The Way” (BBC session)

(Source: suicidewatch)

Played 5,339 times. via Oscillate Wildly.

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